SafetyNetwork.info provides information for Safety Professionals, HR Managers, Company Directors and all Managers with safety responsibilities.

Post Something!

Recent Activity

  • posted
    X
  • posted
    X
  • posted
    X
  • posted
    X
  • posted
    X

New Members

Online Now

23 guests

Top Rated Posts

  • Halifax firm fined over explosion at primary school A gas servicing firm in Hal...
  • Plastics manufacturer fined after employee was injured by machinery
    A plastics manufacturer, which specialises in the manufacturing of traffic barriers and cones, has been fined after an employee’s finger was severed due to inadequately guarded machinery.Plastics-manufacturer-fined-after-employManchester Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 5 November 2018, the 36-year-old employee of Melba Products Limited had been refilling the hopper of a blow moulding machine with plastic granules from bags at their site on Manchester Road, Bury. Work gloves that had been inside one of the bags fell into the hopper and through the guard. Whilst reaching through a large gap in the top of the hopper guard to retrieve the gloves, his middle finger contacted dangerous parts of the blender resulting in it being severed down to the knuckle of his second finger.The HSE’s investigation found that the blender had not been sufficiently guarded to prevent access to dangerous parts of machinery. There was a large gap of approximately 4 x 5 inches towards the top of the hopper guard. The injured employee had only been operating the machine for one week prior to the incident.Melba Products Limited failed to carry out a risk assessment of the blender, to put in place appropriate control measures to prevent access to dangerous parts and to implement a suitable system of training and supervising of new starters.Melba Products Limited of Bury, pleaded guilty of breaching section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. The company was fined £125,000 and ordered to pay costs of £5,387.HSE Inspector Alex McFarland said after the hearing: “This injury was entirely preventable and could have been avoided by ensuring the machine was being operated safely, with a suitable guard in place. Adequate supervision should also have been in place to ensure the machine was being used safely by newer operatives.“Employers should make sure they properly assess and apply effective control measures to minimise the risk from dangerous parts of machinery.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/in-court/melba-products-limited-fined-after-employee-was-injured-by-mach...
  • Wholesalers fined £120,000 for failings that led to fall
    A Glasgow based company has admitted a health and safety offence after an employee fell through a fragile plasterboard ceiling, sustaining life-changing injuries.A 24-year-old warehouseman was retrieving stock from a mezzanine in his company’s warehouse when he stepped on to an unguarded area of fragile plasterboard, Glasgow Sheriff Court was told. The incident happened on 5 November 2017.The employee fell through the plasterboard, landing on a concrete floor at the bottom of a stairwell. A drop of more than five metres. He was taken to hospital where he was initially unresponsive and diagnosed as having a skull fracture, bleeding on the brain and other significant injuries.He has been left with cognitive difficulties, hearing loss, facial palsy and problems tasting food and the family has been significantly impacted.The case was investigated by Glasgow City Council who found that the company had a generic risk assessment for a wide variety of activities within the premises. The risk assessment did not refer to or identify any risks associated with working on or accessing the mezzanine level. The company had not implemented any control measures for employees working near the plasterboard. Stock was being stored very close to the plasterboard and employees were regularly called upon to access this area to retrieve stock.The investigation found that it was entirely foreseeable that an employee might step onto this unguarded plasterboard. The incident had happened as a result of the company’s failure to identify the risks of staff accessing the stock items stored near to the plasterboard ceiling on the mezzanine area.Since the incident, the company has changed its working practices.Alfa (Wholesale) Limited, a wholesale grocery, catering supply and household goods company, pled guilty to a contravention of Sections 2(1) and Section 33(1)(a) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. It was fined £120,000.Alistair Duncan, Head of Health and Safety Division said: “This was a foreseeable and avoidable accident resulting in the severe injury and permanent impairment of a young man. It is easy to imagine this having been a fatality.  “Alfa (Wholesale) Limited accepted liability and the Crown accepted their guilty plea to the contraventions of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.“This was an accident that resulted in life changing injuries that could have been avoided if the appropriate measures had been in place at the time.“Hopefully this prosecution and the sentence will remind other employers that failure to fulfil their obligations can have serious consequences and that they will be held to account for their failings.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/in-court/alfa-wholesale-limited-fined-120000-for-failings-that-led-to-fa...
  • Four killed in Avonmouth water works explosion
    Four people have died, and another has been injured in a ‘large explosion’ at waste-water treatment works near Bristol.A large explosion occurred in a silo that held treated biosolids at Wessex Water’s premises on an industrial area on Kings Weston Lane in Avonmouth. The BBC reported that firefighters were called the scene at 11:20 GMT on Thursday 3 December. Three employees of Wessex Water and a contractor were confirmed to have been killed in the blast, an investigations into its cause continues. The men have been named as Luke Wheaton, 16, Ray White, 57, Brian Vickery, 63, and Mike James, 64.A fifth person was injured, but is not thought to be in a life-threatening condition.Avon and Somerst Police declared a major incident and urged members of the public to avoid the area. It also reassured the public there is ‘not believed to be any ongoing public safety concerns following the incident’ and that the explosion was not being treated as terror-related. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and emergency services are investigating the cause of the explosion.Colin Skellett, Wessex Water Chief Executive, released the following statement in the days after the incident: “We are all absolutely devastated by what has happened.“Our hearts go out to the family, friends and colleagues of those who lost their lives during this tragic event.“I know from thoughts and comments I have received from so many, that this has affected the whole Wessex Water family.“I know Avonmouth, I worked there for many years, and I know the people, some who whom have lost their lives during this terrible incident.“We have never had a fatality at Wessex Water before. Despite all of our procedures, systems, protocols and training, this awful event has happened.“We are determined to find out what happened and why and we will worth with all the relevant authorities to do just that.”Giles Hyder, HSE’s Head of Operations in the South West said: “We send our deepest condolences to the families of those who tragically died. It is important a joint investigation with the police is carried out.“We will provide specialist support to what is likely to be a complex investigation under the command of the police.”A witness reported hearing a “very loud explosion” that “shook buildings”.What are biosolids?Biosolids are solid organic matter recovered from a sewage treatment process and used as fertilizer. According to Wessex Water biosolids, or ‘treated sludget, is a by-product of is treatment process. It says “we treat sludge in anaerobic digesters to produce agricultural fertiliser and renewable energy.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/news/avonmouth-warehouse-explosion/
  • Engineering firm sentenced after employee suffers permanent nerve damage
    An engineering company has been fined after a worker was diagnosed with hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS).Prior to 22 October 2018, an overall lack of management relating to the use of vibrating tools at AIM Engineering Ltd led to an employee being diagnosed with HAVS, Manchester Magistrates’ Court was told. Regular use of vibrating tools causes the painful and disabling disorder which, in this case, has left the employee with irreparable nerve damage to the hands and arms.The HSE’s investigation found that AIM Engineering Ltd of Wythenshaw, Manchester did not monitor how much work the employees were doing with vibrating tools. In addition, the company did not have any health surveillance in place, which would have picked up early signs of the disease. In 2017 an external company made recommendations to reduce employees’ exposure to vibration when working with vibrating tools, and to implement health surveillance. This resulted in an employee being diagnosed with HAVS.AIM Engineering Ltd of Southmoor Industrial Estate, Southmoor Road, Manchester pleaded guilty to breaching of Regulation 2 (1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act etc. 1974 and was fined £300,000 with costs of £7,831.90.Speaking after the hearing, HSE Inspector Jennifer French said: “This was a case of the company completely failing to grasp the importance of controlling employees’ exposure to vibration. Had appropriate controls been in place to reduce the amount of vibration workers were exposed to, and appropriate health surveillance put in place, the employee’s condition would not have been allowed to develop to a severe and life altering stage.

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/noise-and-vibration/aim-engineering-ltd-sentenced-after-employee-suffers...
  • Lightwater Valley Theme Park: £333,344 fine after child rollercoaster fall
    Lightwater Valley Attractions Ltd has been fined £333,344 and ordered to pay costs of £16,183 after a child was left with life-changing head injuries after being thrown from a ride.LWV1-300x159.jpgThe incident happened at the theme park in North Yorkshire on 30 May 2019. The child was ejected from the Twister ride. North Yorkshire Police responded to a call at approximately 11:30am. A statement released at the time read: “The child was conscious when officers arrived at the scene and has been taken to hospital. His condition is not believed to be life threatening.According to the HSE investigation, the theme park’s procedures for the ride stated that anyone between 1.2m and 1.5m tall must wear seat belts, but the procedure was not always followed. This was proven by CCTV footage and was mentioned in statements by members of the public. On examination of the restraining systems, many belts were not functioning correctly. On several occasions, the final position of the lap bar restraint allowed significant gaps to remain in the containment and did not fully contain smaller passengers.Speaking after the hearing, HSE Inspector Andrea Jones said: “Our investigation found that the theme park did not implement suitable operating procedures and monitoring of ride operators in relation to the ride restraints.“This was an entirely avoidable incident. Several children were put at risk and Lightwater Valley has now been held to account for their failings.”The child’s mother said “the little boy I took to Lightwater Valley that day is not the same boy that woke up after the surgery. I still grieve for my little boy.”At the time of the incident, the theme park issued the following statement: “We can confirm that following an incident on one of our rides this morning, a child is receiving treatment at a local hospital.“We take the health and safety of our visitors very seriously and are committed to providing support to the affected family. We will continue working closely with the HSE and emergency services.“The ride concerned will remain closed until a full investigation has taken place.”In the days following the incident Ian Cunningham, Lightwater Valley’s Chief Executive, apologised to the boy’s family. He said: “Everyone at Lightwater Valley Theme Park is very pleased to hear that the condition of the young boy who fell from our Twister ride is improving.“As a father myself, I can imagine only too well how it must have felt for everyone involved when the incident happened, and in the hours since. Our thoughts and concerns are completely focused on the child and his family at this difficult time.“I would like to say how sorry I am personally for the upset and anxiety that this incident has caused. We are committed to offering our full support to the family.“Establishing the cause of the incident is now in the hands of the authorities — we are co-operating fully with the Health & Safety Executive investigation that is now underway.“Until the investigation is complete it will be too early and inappropriate for us to speculate on any aspect of the incident, or answer any specific questions about it.”Woman killed on same rideIn 2001, a 20-year-old woman was killed on the same ride when she suffered head and neck injuries as two carriages collided.A hearing in 2004 heard that faulty wiring was to blame for the incident. The park’s owners and an electrician admitted breaching health and safety laws and were fined a total of £157,000.In 2017, owners of Lightwater Valley were fined £40,000 after a girl suffered horrific injuries on one of its rides. The five-year-old suffered crushing injuries to her ankle after her leg was caught in a gap between the carriage and the edge of a disembarking platform on a children’s rollercoaster.Earlier this month, SHP reported that a fairground ride inspector had been fined after he issued a safety certificate for a rollercoaster without ensuring he had a crucial safety report for it. The ride at M & D Theme Park subsequently derailed causing serios injury to those on board.

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/leisure-and-entertainment/leisure-and-entertainment-lightwater-valley-th...
  • Engineering company sentenced after apprentice narrowly escapes serious injury
    A plant hire company has been fined after an apprentice avoided a potentially fatal crush injury from a mobile crane.During proceedings at Knights Chamber, Nightingale Court, in Peterborough it was heard that on 3 August 2016, an apprentice at M&J Engineers Limited had climbed on to the roof of an accommodation cabin to attach a power float to the chains of a mobile crane. The crane operator, who had not been appropriately trained, began to extend the boom and move the crane into position. The crane had not been set up correctly and the boom of the crane toppled over toward the apprentice. The apprentice jumped out of the way of the boom avoiding a potentially fatal incident. However, his fall from height caused injuries to his leg and back.The HSEs investigation found the company did not have a safe system of work in place and the crane operator had not been adequately trained. There was no clear instruction concerning the use of the crane or which areas the crane was prohibited from operating. They also had no way of ensuring that the apprentice was suitably managed.M&J Engineers of Cashel Works, Cadwell Lane, Hitchin, Hertfordshire was found guilty of breaching Section 2(1) Health and safety at Work etc Act 1974. They were fined £220,000 and ordered to pay costs of £65,443.72.Speaking after the hearing, HSE Inspector Nigel Fitzhugh said: “Those in control of work have a responsibility to provide adequate training to their employees so that they can operate equipment safely and devise safe methods of working. This includes providing the appropriate information, instruction and training to their workers.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/in-court/mj-engineers-sentenced-after-apprentice-narrowly-escapes-seriou...
  • Company fined after machine operator suffered serious leg injury
    A titanium supplier has been fined after an employee sustained multiple fractures to his leg whilst operating a metal cutting band saw machine.Steven McDonald, a VSMPO Tirus Limited employee, was seriously injured by a falling titanium plate, Kidderminster Magistrates’ Court was told. Almost 1.5 tonnes of titanium plate fell from the bed of a metal cutting band saw machine trapping his leg underneath. The sheets being cut were significantly larger than the machine bed. The incident happened at The IO Centre in Nash Road, Redditch, on 20 September 2017.The HSE’s investigation found the company had failed to suitably and sufficiently assess the risk of material falling from the machine bed and failed to put in measures to control the risk. An extension to the machine bed or stanchions with back stops would have prevented the material from falling from the machine bed.VSMPO Tirus Limited of Nash Road, Redditch, Worcestershire pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. They were fined £200,000 and ordered to pay costs of £7,293.15.Steven McDonald said: “This has been the worst couple of years of my life. I feel I have been dealt a bad hand. I have come through it, but I have a long way to go. My recovery isn’t going to be a quick fix and I think everyone knows this. My friends, family and the company have supported me.”HSE inspector Elizabeth Thomas added: “A simple, cost-effective solution could have prevented this horrendous injury.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/in-court/vsmpo-tirus-limited-fined-after-machine-operator-suffered-serio...
  • Housing association sentenced after employees suffer debilitating nerve damage
    Liverpool housing association company Onward Homes Ltd has been fined after four employees developed a debilitating nerve condition over a period of several years.Liverpool Magistrates’ Court heard that the affected employees developed Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS), whilst working at various sites carrying out ground maintenance and general construction work using vibrating power tools on a daily basis. Regular use of vibrating tools causes the painful and disabling disorder which, in this case, has left the employees with nerve damage to the hands and arms; making everyday tasks and leisure activities difficult or impossible.The HSE’s investigation found that Onward Homes Ltd failed to prevent or reduce its employees’ exposure to intensive and protracted vibration. Employees were not provided with information and training in relation to the risks of exposure to vibration, and were unaware they were at risk, or of the need for health surveillance and ways to minimise exposure using controls. Had the employees been aware, exposure could have been reduced or eliminated.Onward Homes Ltd of Hanover Street, Liverpool pleaded guilty to breaches of Regulation 5(1), 6(1) and 7 of the Control of Vibration at Work Regulations 2005. The company was fined £80,000 and ordered to pay costs of £5,293.10Speaking after the hearing, HSE Inspector Emily Osborne said: “If exposure to vibration is not controlled, workers can end up being diagnosed with HAVS, which can be the cause of significant ill-health, triggering painful and disabling disorders of the blood vessels, nerves and joints. Under these circumstances HSE can and will investigate; and prosecute where appropriate.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/in-court/onward-homes-ltd-sentenced-after-employees-suffer-debilitating-...