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  • Halifax firm fined over explosion at primary school A gas servicing firm in Hal...
  • Is your materials handling equipment still fit for purpose?
    Stewart Gosling of RDD, UK importers for Mitsubishi Forklift Trucks, believes the way in which businesses return to work could be pivotal — with visionaries seizing the opportunity to review their entire operation: the loads they move, the methods and equipment they use, and the number, safety and effectiveness of the staff on site. In short, is everything still fit for purpose?It’s no surprise that the return to work has been slower and more tentative than many predicted. Most employers are acutely aware of their responsibilities, and staff are understandably concerned about their welfare… and job security.To help you figure that out, RDD has created a resource centre containing free, practical guides, how-to videos, posters, checklists and case studies showing ways that companies have cut costs or solved intractable problems.Stewart says: “For me, the most interesting and valuable of these is a purpose-built Back To Work Health Check, which we’ve made available as a PDF or an interactive online questionnaire. Deceptively simple yet comprehensive, it allows a busy manager to review their storage and handling operations for both the short and longer term.”For convenience, and because functions may be divided among a number of colleagues, the survey is split into three areas:Site – puts the focus on what may have changed in recent times and what could affect future activities.Equipment – explores whether handling equipment meets HSE guidelines (and forthcoming changes in legislation), the adequacy and safety of storage, as well as potential health issues from emissions.People – covers everything from training regimes and pedestrian segregation, to materials handling procedures and social distancing measures.

    Top tips for improving materials handling safety and efficiency on site

    Use that human touchGo-Back-Better-300x200.jpg“We are aware that this is a time for listening and working with the wider community to help people find the best possible outcomes,” emphasises Stewart Gosling. “By talking to someone who’s done it all before, users of materials handling equipment can familiarise themselves with the latest techniques and technologies — many of which may been introduced since the customer was last in the market.“That’s why we are making available, without any obligation, the services of our national network of site survey specialists. They can help a manager review and examine ways to adapt and improve operations — often at low or no cost.“It was their idea to create the Back to Work Health Check. They appreciate more than anyone the importance of the most appropriate site configuration as well as the correct number and types of trucks for each specific application.“It’s important to remember that equipment is extremely cheap when compared to the cost of an operator — so it pays to make sure they have the tools to get the job done… along with the appropriate skill-set and training.”Future-proof your decisionsIn a world that has seen so much change in such a short space of time, Stewart Gosling urges businesses to do everything possible to future-proof their decisions.“In terms of motive power, for example, the HSE is increasingly critical of the use of IC engine trucks in confined spaces. Where LP gas or diesel can’t be avoided, the buyer should be aware that all new trucks will need to comply with Stage 5 emission standards.“Similarly, if you’re serious about employee welfare, you’ll want to make sure your next forklift comes equipped with measures to prevent the spread of airborne dust particles which are a real health hazard in indoor spaces.”Meet HSE guidelines for unexpected benefitsPart of the survey addresses the use of hand pallet trucks. If you are using them frequently or to move loads at their maximum capacity, you might well be in breach of HSE guidelines. Switching from a manual hand pallet truck to an electric one reduces the cumulative strain on operators and lowers the risk of absenteeism due to injury.Open your horizons“After all we’ve been through, there’s a natural tendency to focus solely on what we are forced to do in order to comply,” sums up Stewart Gosling. “My message to businesses is to take a moment and explore ways to go back better. What have you got to lose?  Armed with this online survey and with the option of calling in someone to provide some specialist knowledge you can not only make your site COVID-secure, but financially robust and fully geared for the challenges — and opportunities — ahead.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/uncategorized/is-your-materials-handling-equipment-still-fit-for-purpose...
  • Project launched to protect HGV drivers from COVID-19 in Uganda
    Supported by the Employment and Skills for Development in Africa (E4D) Programme, Transaid has launched an urgent response to support heavy goods vehicle (HGV) drivers in Uganda, as Africa reacts to the growing COVID-19 pandemic.Transaid Transaid_2-300x156.pngis working with local partners to roll-out driver-specific COVID-19 safety advice and provide hand-washing facilities, cab sanitisation materials, and personal protective equipment (PPE) to keep drivers safe, reduce transmission rates and build community confidence in the safety of the logistics sector.Transaid CEO Caroline Barber told SHD Logistics Magazine that truck drivers were facing hostility as a result of the measures taken to prevent the spread of COVID-19. “Road transport is vital for delivering food, medicines and essential goods; but the race to control the outbreak in Africa means truck drivers are facing increased scrutiny whilst enduring evermore challenging and unpredictable hazards to keep supply chains running.“Truck drivers entering the country are perceived by some to be facilitating the spread of the virus, and have faced hostility from communities and long delays at borders, often with no access to sanitation facilities. Securing this funding means we can start work immediately to improve the preparedness of drivers to meet national guidelines on the use of PPE, cab sanitisation and social distancing.”“We are developing driver-specific factsheets as well as short information videos to be sent to drivers’ phones to raise awareness and reduce the risk of exposure. Road safety messaging has been integrated into these materials to warn how changing conditions – such as how fewer vehicles on the roads and reduced access to facilities en route could lead to increased speeds and fewer rest stops – may affect driving behaviours and the risk of road crashes, at a time when health systems are already overburdened.“Currently, the closure of businesses along transport corridors is making it difficult for drivers to access running water to wash their hands. To counter this, we are procuring soap and disinfectants for regular hand-washing and cab sanitisation, as well as locally made, washable and reusable face masks.”Transaid’s in-country partner Safe Way Right Way is also supporting transport associations at driver rest stops and border posts, to help keep drivers informed on the latest national guidelines. With official advice being updated regularly, it has been difficult for employers to communicate with drivers who may be on the road for days or weeks at a time without returning to base.E4D is a regional employment initiative funded by the German, Norwegian, and until recently the British government, and implemented by GIZ. Julia Mager, E4D Team Leader in Uganda at GIZ commented: “We’ve been working with Transaid and Safe Way Right Way for the last three years to build HGV driver training capacity in Uganda. Both organisations are well placed to deliver this critical work.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/road-safety/transaid-project-launched-to-protect-hgv-drivers-from-covid-...
  • App launched to help rescue workers extricate vehicle occupants
    Euro NCAP, the consumer vehicle safety testing organisation, has launched a ‘Euro RESCUE app’, giving rescue workers easier access to ‘rescue sheets’, detailed information for different car models on how to quickly and safely extricate occupants.accident-1409012_1280-300x225.jpgThe immediate moments following a collision, referred to as the ‘golden hour’ can mean life or death for injured parties. It’s the time following a traumatic injury during which there is the highest likelihood that prompt medical and surgical treatment will prevent death. Therefore, it’s critical that first responders can access the injured to emergency care as quickly and safely as possible.One of the major challenges in that process following a road traffic accident, is accessing the information to know where and how to cut vehicles open to safely extricate occupants. The development of modern vehicles has seen the introduction of devices such as airbags and electrical vehicle batteries, which have only added to the complexity, and the dangers for rescue teams.  With thousands of different vehicle models on the roads, of varying ages, getting up-to-date access to the correct rescue sheet is also a technical and logistical challenge.

    Euro RESCUE App

    To combat this, Euro NCAP has launched a new ‘Euro RESCUE App‘, available for phones and tablets running Apple or Google Android software. The app includes all vehicles models tested since the beginning of 2020 will be available and will eventually be available in the 23 EU languages. It has launched in English, French, German and Spanish.A newly agreed ISO international standard for rescue sheet design is also helping bring consistency to the information.Ensuring better availability of vehicle rescue sheets was one of the points repeatedly raised during ETSC’s Revive project, a collaboration between road safety actors and emergency services, which looked at improving emergency response in Europe.

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/road-safety/euro-rescue-app-launched-to-help-rescue-workers-extricate-ve...
  • Isle of Wight worker dies during demolition project
    Three construction companies have been fined after a worker suffered fatal injuries while demolishing a two-storey building in preparation for a development project.Ryde-demolition-image-small-300x225.jpgPortsmouth Crown Court heard how David Shayler, an employee of Ryde Demolition Limited, was removing roof timbers by hand with a colleague, when a gable wall partially collapsed causing him to fall backwards striking his head against a stack of roof tiles.An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) into the incident which occurred on the 13 October 2016, found that the work was inadequately planned and managed by all the duty holders involved in the project, the technique used to remove the roof timbers was done out of sequence, and the brick gable had been left unstable. In addition, inadequate provision was made to prevent falls from height, despite concerns raised by workers in the days leading up to the incident.Ryde Demolition Ltd of St Johns Hill, Ryde have pleaded guilty to breaching two counts of Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and have been fined £80,000 and ordered to pay costs of £12,132.02.HJ Bennett Ltd of Pyle Street, Newport have pleaded guilty to breaching two counts of Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and have been fined £120,000 and ordered to pay costs of £12,057.62.Stoneham Construction Limited of St Johns Place, Newport have pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 13(1) of the Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 2015 and have been fined £56,667 and ordered to pay costs of £12,004.42.Speaking after the case, HSE inspector Dominic Goacher said: “This was a tragic and wholly avoidable incident, caused by the companies’ failure to implement safe systems of work.”“Demolition is a high-risk activity whose safe execution is complex and technical and where expertise is vital. The risk of unintended structural collapse is well known within the industry. Demolition requires careful planning and execution by contractors who are competent in the full range of demolition techniques.”“Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work-related fatalities in this country, and the risks associated with working at height are well known. In this case the risks of structural collapse and falling from height were not controlled, which led to the preventable death of a father-of-two.” 

    from: https://press.hse.gov.uk/2020/08/27/isle-of-wight-worker-dies-during-demolition-project/?utm_source=...
  • HSE issues MoD with Crown Censure following death of military diver
    The Ministry of Defence (MoD) has been issued with a Crown Censure by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) after a military diver died during training.On 26 March 2018, 27-year-old Lance Corporal George Partridge was brought back to surface after he stopped responding to lifeline signals while he was underwater. He was sadly pronounced dead after CPR was performed. He had been on a training course at the National Diving and Activity Centre in Chepstow. Lance Corporal Partridge and his dive buddy were tasked with attaching a distance line from the base of a shot line to the underwater wreck of a helicopter at a depth of 27m. When he was recovered his cylinders were found to be empty.HSE served two Crown Improvement Notices relating to the failure to train all army divers how to undertake air endurance calculations and to assess the risk of a diver running out of air.Julian Tuvey, a HSE inspector who specialises in diving, said:“This was a tragedy for all concerned however just like any other employer, the MoD has a responsibility to reduce dangers to its personnel, as far as they properly can. The scenario of a diver running out of air is a very real risk that needs to managed.”Today, at Whale Island, by accepting the Crown Censure, the MoD admitted breaching its duty under Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 in that they failed to ensure, so far as was reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare at work of all its employees, including George Partridge, in relation to the risks associated with diving exercises.

    from: https://press.hse.gov.uk/2020/09/02/hse-issues-mod-with-crown-censure-following-death-of-military-di...
  • Three construction firms hit with fines totalling £256k after worker dies during...
    A trio of construction companies have been fined after a worker suffered fatal injuries while demolishing a two-storey building in preparation for a development project.Three-construction-firms-hit-with-fines-David Shayler, an employee of Ryde Demolition Limited, was removing roof timbers by hand with a colleague, when a gable wall partially collapsed causing him to fall backwards striking his head against a stack of roof tiles, Portsmouth Crown Court was told.The HSE’s investigation found that the work was inadequately planned and managed by all the duty holders involved in the project, the technique used to remove the roof timbers was done out of sequence, and the brick gable had been left unstable. In addition, inadequate provision was made to prevent falls from height, despite concerns raised by workers in the days leading up to the incident.The incident occurred on the 13 October 2016.Ryde Demolition Ltd of St Johns Hill, Ryde pleaded guilty to breaching two counts of Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and have been fined £80,000 and ordered to pay costs of £12,132.02.HJ Bennett Ltd of Pyle Street, Newport have pleaded guilty to breaching two counts of Section 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and have been fined £120,000 and ordered to pay costs of £12,057.62.Stoneham Construction Limited of St Johns Place, Newport have pleaded guilty to breaching Regulation 13(1) of the Construction (Design & Management) Regulations 2015 and have been fined £56,667 and ordered to pay costs of £12,004.42.Speaking after the case, HSE Inspector Dominic Goacher said: “This was a tragic and wholly avoidable incident, caused by the companies’ failure to implement safe systems of work.”“Demolition is a high-risk activity whose safe execution is complex and technical and where expertise is vital. The risk of unintended structural collapse is well known within the industry. Demolition requires careful planning and execution by contractors who are competent in the full range of demolition techniques.”“Falls from height remain one of the most common causes of work-related fatalities in this country, and the risks associated with working at height are well known. In this case the risks of structural collapse and falling from height were not controlled, which led to the preventable death of a father-of-two.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/in-court/three-construction-firms-hit-with-fines-totalling-256k-after-wo...
  • How the engineering industry is helping combat COVID-19
    Living through the coronavirus outbreak has been a trying time for everybody, bringing with it a series of overarching questions regarding how long the pandemic is going to last, the impact it might have on the economy, and the total number of people it’s likely to affect. Up to this point, the deadly virus has already killed tens of thousands of people and forced millions more to self-isolate in their own home, in order to halt its spread. However, rather than dwell on the doom and gloom associated with the virus, this unparalleled situation has also brought out the best in people and seen the world come together like never before. From Captain Tom Moore raising much-needed funds for the NHS to millions of people throughout the UK joining in on the ‘Clap for our Carers’ movement, there have been numerous examples of people standing up and showing their dedication towards helping where they can.The engineering industry has been no exception either. 

    How the engineering industry is helping combat COVID-19

    In the battle against COVID-19, many engineering companies have had no choice but to forget about their various planned conferences and put their production procedures on hold, investigating alternative ways to use their resources within the aid effort. Join us as we take a detailed look at some of the key ways engineers have helped combat the coronavirus outbreak over the past few months. 

    Ventilators

    Ventilator-300x200.jpgSince the coronavirus is a respiratory-based infection, it largely affects the lungs and the ability of affected people to breathe correctly. As a result of this, ventilators are required to help aid breathing and ensure enough oxygen is being pumped around the body. However, with the numbers of COVID-19 at an unprecedently high level, there haven’t been enough ventilators to go around, leaving thousands of people vulnerable to succumbing to their infection. That was until the engineering industry decided to step in and help. Since the government called on the engineering industry to help with the shortfall of ventilators at the backend of March, many companies have worked tirelessly to assemble thousands more of the life-saving devices. This has included manufacturers who aren’t even explicitly known for designing or developing medical supplies – companies such as Dyson, which normally produce vacuum cleaners, and Bindatex, which typically cut advanced materials. Engineers from UCL even went one step further to help the efforts as well, working alongside doctors at the University College London Hospital and engineers at Mercedes Formula 1 to create specialist devices that actually avoid the need for invasive ventilators in the first place. 

    PPE equipment

    While on the topic of manufacturing lifesaving equipment, engineering companies haven’t stopped at producing ventilators. The lack of PPE equipment for frontline NHS workers has been well-documented in recent weeks and, as a result, the engineering industry decided to step up to the plate, helping manufacture protective equipment for doctors, nurses and other medical staff to use.Having engineers step-in in this way has proved to be a no-brainer in light of the pandemic. In one example, a collaboration between companies based in Inverness found that it only took a week to design, develop and deliver more than 1,000 face-shields for staff to use in the nearby hospitals. This will have helped not only save many lives but also reassure medical staff that protective equipment can be readily available if and when required. 

    Medical testing

    Since COVID-19 is so contagious, staying a safe distance away from those who are affected is an important step towards avoiding infection. With this in mind, some engineers in China have developed a robot capable of treating and testing COVID-19 patients, while enabling healthcare workers to remain safely away from the infection themselves. The remote-controlled machines can perform many of the jobs that healthcare workers do, including taking mouth swabs, performing ultrasound scans and listening to organs with a specialised stethoscope.What’s more, the medical staff are always in control – using a remote control and on-board cameras, they can operate the robots from a safe distance to monitor the patient. Even more remarkably, the robots have been designed by Chief Designer Professor Zheng Gangtie to disinfect themselves after performing any actions that require contact with an infected individual. Final thoughts…The COVID-19 pandemic has been a trying period for everyone throughout the globe but, as the examples listed prove, we are really are all in this together.By coming together to help those in need at a time when they need it most, the engineering industry has not only demonstrated how adaptable it can be in times of trouble, but it has also saved the lives of hundreds upon hundreds of potentially vulnerable people as well. 

    from: https://www.shponline.co.uk/blog/how-the-engineering-industry-is-helping-combat-covid-19/
  • 2019/20 England fire and rescue incident statistics show ‘lowest number of fatal...
    The Home Office has released its latest fire and rescue incident statistics, for the year ending March 2020, with some of the key results summarised here.The report covers statistics about incidents attended by fire and rescue services (FRSs) in England for 2019/20 (or the year ending March 2020). The statistics are sourced from the Home Office’s online Incident Recording System (IRS) and include statistics on all incidents, fire-related fatalities and casualties from fires, with long term comparisons.Key results
    • FRSs attended 557,299 incidents in 2019/20. This was a 3% decrease compared with the previous year (576,391). Of these incidents, there were 153,957 fires. This was a 16% decrease compared with the previous year (182,915) with falls in all types of fires but particularly driven by a 23% fall in secondary fires now that the hot, dry 2018 summer is in the comparator year;
    • There were 243 fire-related fatalities in 2019/20 (the lowest number of fire-related fatalities in the annual series) compared with 253 in the previous year;
    • Of all incidents attended by FRSs, fires accounted for 28%, fire false alarms 42% and non-fire incidents 31%. This compares with fires accounting for 35%, fire false alarms 42% and non-fire incidents 23% 10 years ago;
    • Fire and rescue services attended 775 fires in purpose-built high-rise (defined as 10+ storeys) flats, which was a 6% decrease compared with the previous year (821).
    Incidents that FRSs attend are categorised into three main types – fires attended, non-fire incidents and fire false alarms.

    from: https://www.shponline.co.uk/fire-safety-and-emergency/2019-20-england-fire-and-rescue-statistics-sho...
  • £200k fine for maritime firm after employee fractures foot
    A maritime freight and logistics company has been fined after a worker suffered multiple bone fractures to his foot when a forklift truck was driven over it.A worker was injured when a 15-tonne forklift truck drove over his foot during unloading and stacking of steel coils in a shed at premises in Corporation Road, Newport, Newport Magistrates Court was told. The incident happened on 5 January 2018.The HSE’s investigation found that there was inadequate control of workplace transport risks. The company had also failed to conduct a suitable and sufficient assessment of controls for workplace transport.Simec Ports (UK) Limited, formerly known as Cargo Services (UK) Ltd, was found guilty of breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974. The company has been fined £200,000 and ordered to pay costs of £8,732.04.Speaking after the case, HSE Inspector, Sian Donne said: “Failure to ensure that workplace transport is managed safely is a serious breach of fundamental health and safety duties.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/in-court/200k-fine-for-simec-ports-after-employee-fractures-foot/
  • £120k fine for manufacturer after employee fatally crushed
    A manufacturer of adhesive tape has been fined after a worker was fatally injured while operating a rewind slitting machine.Mr Brett Dolby was operating the machine, designed to cut a large roll of adhesive material into narrower rolls, when he was drawn into an in-running nip between a rotating roller and the adhesive material. Mr Dolby’s colleagues found him trapped in the machine at the factory in Dunstable, having suffered fatal crush injuries. The incident happened on 10 April 2018.The HSE’s investigation found that Mr Dolby was required to work close to an unguarded in-running nip whilst the rewind slitting machine was in operation, which presented a hazard due to rotating parts. The risk assessment for the machine was inadequate because it failed to identify the in-running nips and other hazards on the machine. Therefore, machine operators were provided with inadequate information and training relating to the risks associated with this operation; and employees were placed at severe risk of injury.The company previously received advice in 2012 from both the HSE and an external consultant in relation to the guarding of machinery on site, but had failed to take action to ensure the necessary guarding of the rewind slitting machine prior to the incident in April 2018.Scapa UK Limited of Ashton Under Lyne, Manchester, pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974 and was fined £120,000 with full costs of £15,192.68.After the hearing HSE Inspector Emma Page said: “This tragic incident could easily have been prevented if the company had properly assessed and applied effective control measures to minimise the risks from dangerous parts of the machinery.“The dangers associated with in-running nips are well known, and a wealth of advice and guidance is freely available from HSE and other organisations.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/in-court/120k-fine-for-scapa-uk-limited-after-employee-fatally-crushed/
  • 71% of all UK excavation work is now preceded by a thorough search for pipes and...
    ‘Tipping point’ reached, in terms of safe digging in Britain, as searching revolution leaves workers safer than ever, according to LSBUD Digging Up Britain 2020 report, but there remains ‘work to be done to ensure total safety’.Digging-Up-Britain-2020-report-212x300.jThe Digging Up Britain 2020 report, produced by LSBUD, which provides a free to use online underground asset search facility, has provided a welcome safety boost to UK excavation work, by revealing that 71% of all digging work that takes place in the UK is now preceded by a thorough search for pipes and cables.The report details that a record 2,832,027 enquiries were registered on its collaborative portal in 2019. This is a 10% increase on the previous year, and almost double that of just five years ago. A search enquiry was placed every 3.7 seconds during the average working day.Richard Broome, Managing Director of LSBUD, comments: “We have reached a ‘tipping point’ in terms of safe digging – both for the UK’s underground pipes and cables, and those who dig near them. Asset searching on the LSBUD portal has rapidly become second nature for people. It’s now a standard step in the vast majority of excavation projects. It’s great to see it now such an intrinsic part of safe working practices.”LSBUD has also identified changes in behaviour from asset owners. 2019 saw more utility companies using the data generated by the portal to manage risk, futureproof their networks, and better identify areas of potential weakness. They are increasingly using historical data to predict who is likely to work within the vicinity of their network, the type of work they are going to do, when they are going to do it and the exact locations – to better target advice, support and supervision.Excavation-search-numbers-1.jpgIncrease in ‘emergency searches’Digging Up Britain 2020 not only analyses the volumes but also the type of digging work taking place. It reports that ‘emergency searches’ increased by 59% on the previous year and 197% on two years ago with 316,922 searches deemed as urgent in 2019. This is a key consideration for health and safety professionals as emergency projects are more likely to result in an asset strike of a more severe nature.Richard Broome adds: “This continued growth in emergency projects is worrying. While our portal delivers results often in minutes, if an asset isn’t registered with us, the firm doing the digging will need to deal with the asset owner directly and that can take up to 28 days. This time scale does not fit with the idea of an ‘emergency’ – so corners may be cut, and assets struck due to the need for speed. That’s a real health and safety concern, which is why it’s so important for all asset owners to come on board.”The Report also identifies whose workers are doing the majority of digging and therefore provides an indicator of the workforces most vulnerable to asset-strikes. As in previous years, the majority of digging work is done on behalf of the telecoms sector, with its contractors and operators completing 911,455 searches and making up 32% of all searches in 2019. The water industry followed with 592,126 searches, accounting for 21% of the total.Whilst the telecoms and water industries did more searches than ever before, their overall share of the total fell. This is due to a 10% increase in enquiries by private individuals, and a surge by agricultural businesses, where searches increased by 42%.Richard-Broome-219x300.jpgRichard Broome continues: “It is good to see the number of searches increasing, but there is still work to be done in order to ensure total safety of workers, contractors and the general public when it comes to digging. In 2019 there were still 1,230 safety related electrical incidents reported to the HSE, 73 of these were injury related. Gas related incidents have steadily come down since 2013, but still there were 1,248 reported to the HSE.”Digging Up Britain 2020 suggests safety could be improved through all asset owners getting involved in the collaborative search portal. Whilst the number is growing, just 10% of water companies currently share their asset information via the LSBUD portal. This means the water sector remains incredibly vulnerable to asset strikes, and those digging near its assets are doing so without a full picture of what is beneath them. This is in stark contrast to gas and electricity companies where 80 and 70% respectively share their network data.Richard Broome concludes: “We have seen significant strides taken in terms of the volumes of assets which can now be easily found, and the numbers of thorough searches taking place before a spade hits the ground. But there is more that can be done.“On the asset owner side, we hope the remaining utility companies recognise the benefits of sharing their information through our portal. In terms of searching, we want to keep the momentum going and get even more people who are doing the digging, be they employees, contractors, or private individuals, to complete a search before any digging work begins. If we have change like this from both sides, and have everyone pulling in the same direction, assets and people will be safer.”

    from: 
    https://www.shponline.co.uk/construction/71-of-all-uk-excavation-work-is-now-preceded-by-a-thorough-...